Dr. David Edelman MD

David Edelman, M.D.

(310) 316-0021

4201 Torrance Blvd, Suite 735
 Torrance, CA 90503

Our Location


David Edelman, M.D.
4201 Torrance Blvd
Suite 735
Torrance, California 90503
Phone: (310) 316-0021

Patient Education

David Edelman would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

David Edelman provides a full range of medical services including the following:


Brain Tumors

Brain tumors can be classified in two ways. Primary brain tumors originate in the brain or the spinal canal, whereas secondary tumors spread from other areas of the body to the brain or the spinal canal. Approximately 25 percent of brain tumors are secondary, and all secondary brain tumors are malignant. The majority of secondary brain tumors are caused by lung cancer that has metastasized. ...


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Acoustic Neuroma

An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor found on the vestibular cochlear nerve, the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. This nerve is behind the ear, right under the brain.

A type of auditory tumor, an acoustic neuroma is also known as a vestibular schwannoma. This type of tumor is usually slow-growing and, although it does not affect brain tissue as cancerous tumors do, it may press against the nerves controlling hearing and balance as it grows. An acoustic neuroma is an uncommon cause of hearing loss. Many patients do not experience any problems from this type of tumor because it may remain very small, but if enlarges enough to exert serious pressure on the brain, it may become life-threatening. ...


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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a severe degenerative neurological disorder that is, unfortunately, always fatal. ALS attacks and destroys the nerve cells (neurons) that control voluntary movement. As muscles atrophy, patients lose motor control, progressively losing the ability to walk, to move their extremities, to swallow and to speak. Eventually, patients with ALS become completely paralyzed and require a ventilator to breathe. In the vast majority of cases of ALS, the cause of the disease is unknown. Patients with ALS usually die within 3 to 5 years of diagnosis, although a small percentage survive for a decade or more. ...


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Aneurysm

An aneurysm is an abnormal bulge in the wall of an artery, an inflated balloon of blood. Aneurysms can occur in many parts of the body. They usually develop where pressure is strongest, that is, in areas where blood vessels divide and branch off. An aneurysm is extremely dangerous since it may result in rupture and subsequent hemorrhage or in the development of a serious clot, leading to a stroke or heart attack. ...


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Aphasia

Aphasia is a communication disorder that leaves patients unable to effectively express or understand spoken or written language. The possibility of recovery from aphasia depends on its cause, which part of the brain is affected, and how extensive the damage is. There are many types of aphasia, and a patient may suffer from more than one type. Aphasia can result from physical or psychological trauma, or from a degenerative process. Aphasia has a variety of causes. Most commonly, the condition results from a stroke or progressive dementia. Other causes of aphasia may include: ...


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Ataxia

Ataxia is a neurological disorder that affects the cerebellum, the part of the brain that controls muscle coordination. In patients with ataxia, damage and degeneration of cells in the cerebellum lead to a lack of control of voluntary movements, like walking, and can also affect speech, eye movement and swallowing. ...


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BOTOX® Injections for Migraines

Although known primarily as a treatment for facial frown lines and "crow's feet," BOTOX® Cosmetic, which is made from a type of bacteria known as Clostridium botulinum type A, also helps, according to the American Headache Society, to reduce the severity and frequency of migraine headaches. Migraines are often caused by reactions to certain triggers that stimulate the production of neurotransmitters in nerve cells, producing pain and other debilitating symptoms. ...


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Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's disease is a degenerative brain disorder that results in a loss of intellectual and social abilities; it affects memory, thinking and behavior. It is the most common form of dementia, interfering with the functioning of more than 5 million people in the United States alone. With the aging American population, Alzheimer's is expected to affect as many as three times that number during the coming decades. While aging is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's, severe memory loss is not a natural part of the aging process. ...


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Chiari Malformation

Chiari malformation (CM) is a structural abnormality in the brain in which the cerebellum is located in a lower position than usual. This happens when the skull is abnormally small or misshapen. Under normal circumstances, the cerebellum is situated at the lower rear of the skull, above the foramen magnum (the opening to the spinal canal). When Chiari malformation occurs, the cerebellum is located below the foramen magnum. In this location, more pressure is exerted on the cerebellum and medulla (brain stem), and the functions they control, including balance and motor control, may be adversely affected. This condition may be congenital or develop as the patient grows and it may or may not result in symptoms. ...


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Craniotomy

Craniotomy is a surgical procedure in which part of the skull is removed in order to view the brain. The piece of skull removed is called a "bone flap." After the necessary brain surgery is performed, the bone flap is fitted back into the skull. Craniotomies are designated in different ways. A frontotemporal, parietal, temporal or suboccipital craniotomy is named after the bone that is removed. The minimally invasive "keyhole" craniotomy, on the other hand, is named after the small dime-sized incision that is made in the skull. ...


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Degenerated Discs

Degenerated discs are a common back problem. The spinal discs, which are soft, gelatinous cushions that separate the vertebrae, wear down during the aging process. Because the discs function as between-the-bones shock absorbers, allowing the spine to bend and twist, this deterioration can result in serious back pain. As discs are damaged or wear away, the amount of space between the vertebrae gets smaller. As the space narrows, joints are placed under greater stress, resulting in further degeneration. ...


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Facet-Joint Injections

Facet-joint injections are both a minimally invasive treatment for back pain caused by inflamed facet joints, and a diagnostic tool for determining whether facet-joint inflammation is a source of pain. Four facet joints connect each vertebra to the vertebra above and below it. A facet-joint injection, administered into either the joint capsule or its surrounding tissue, combines a long-lasting steroid and a local anesthetic. ...


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Herniated Disc

A herniated disc (also called a ruptured or slipped disc) is a damaged "cushion" between two bones in the spine (vertebrae). Normally, the gelatinous discs between the vertebrae hold the bones in place and act as shock absorbers, permitting the spine to bend smoothly. When a disc protrudes beyond its normal parameters, and its tough outer layer of cartilage cracks, the disc is considered "herniated." ...


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Laminectomy

A laminectomy is a surgical procedure to relieve the spinal nerve compression that results from spinal stenosis or a herniated disc. Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of one or more areas of the spinal canal. A herniated disc results when a disc, the gelatinous tissue between two vertebrae, protrudes outside the parameters of the spine. Both spinal stenosis and disc herniation result in excessive pressure on adjacent spinal nerves, causing pain, cramping, numbness, tingling or weakness in the neck, shoulders, arms, lower back or legs, depending on where on the spine the problem occurs. Both conditions may result from aging, injury, or arthritic deterioration. ...


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Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's disease is a progressive motor system disorder that occurs when certain cells within the brain begin to degenerate or break down. In individuals with Parkinson's disease, the cells that produce a chemical called dopamine, gradually breakdown or die. Dopamine is a chemical that sends signals to the brain to control movement. As these cells diminish and the dopamine levels decrease, the disease progresses and patients gradually lose control of their movements. While there is no cure currently available for Parkinson's disease, there are treatments available to control symptoms and improve quality of life. ...


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Spinal Stenosis

Spinal stenosis is the narrowing in one or more areas of the spinal canal as a result of injury or deterioration of the discs, joints or bones of the spine. Most cases of spinal stenosis develop as a result of the degenerative changes that occur during aging. Osteoarthritis is the main cause of spinal stenosis, since this condition causes deterioration of cartilage in the area that leads to the bones rubbing against each other. As bones make repeated abnormal contact, bone spurs form, narrowing the spinal canal. ...


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Stroke

A stroke occurs when there is a reduction in the flow of blood to the brain. The lack of blood supply may be the result of a blockage in an artery or a burst blood vessel in the brain. A stroke deprives brain tissue of oxygen and nutrients, causing brain cells to die. A stroke is a medical emergency and requires immediate attention by a medical professional. Prompt treatment can minimize damage to the brain and prevent further complications. ...


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Subdural Hematoma

A subdural hematoma is a blood clot that develops near the brain. These blood clots are known as subdural hematomas because they form under the dura, which is the protective covering of the brain. Hematomas usually require removal because they can compress brain tissue and cause life-threatening complications. In some cases, a hematoma can be successfully drained by creating a small perforation in the skull called a "burr hole." But, when the subdural hematoma is larger or more severe, an open surgical procedure known as a craniotomy is required. ...


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Transient Ischemic Attack

A transient ischemic attack (TIA) occurs when the blood flow to the brain stops for a brief period of time. A TIA is a stroke-like event caused by improper blood flow in the carotid artery. The carotid artery is located in the neck and it carries blood from the heart to the brain. When blood flow is disrupted or blocked within these arteries, stroke-like symptoms may occur. Symptoms of a TIA are similar to those of a stroke, but they do not last as long, as the blockage within the artery may break-up or dissolve. In some individuals, a transient ischemic attack may be a warning sign that a stroke may occur in the future. ...


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Trigeminal Neuralgia

Trigeminal neuralgia, also known as tic douloureux, is a neurological disorder affecting the trigeminal nerve, the nerve that carries sensory information from the face to the brain. This chronic condition causes severe shooting pain in the face, sometimes as fleeting, momentary twinges, other times as frequent bouts of excruciating pain. Because the trigeminal nerve is responsible for sensation all around the face, including the eyes, mouth and sinus cavities, trigeminal neuralgia can result in pain on one side of the jaw, cheek or mouth, or, less frequently, near the forehead or one of the eyes. ...


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Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that results in recurrent seizures caused by disturbances in brain activity. Epilepsy may develop as a result of abnormal brain wiring, an imbalance in nerve signals, or changes in brain cells. In many cases, the cause of epilepsy is unknown. Sometimes, however, its origin may be traced to genetic predisposition, head injury, tumor, stroke, certain diseases, or prenatal brain damage. Symptoms of epileptic seizures may vary and only individuals who have experienced two or more seizures are considered to have epilepsy. Although seizures may be mild, all forms of epilepsy should be treated, as seizures may put individuals in danger during certain activities. ...


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Essential Tremor

Essential tremor is a type of movement disorder. This is a category of neurological conditions that involve abnormalities in the quality and quantity of spontaneous movement. Essential tremor causes involuntary shaking, particularly in the hands. The tremor tends to appear more pronounced the harder the muscles are working, such as during movement or by extending an arm. When the muscles are at rest, the tremor is typically not noticeable. The tremor may not be consistent initially, but it will frequently worsen as time goes on. In some cases, both sides of the body are not equally affected. Essential tremor is more common as people age and usually develops in people older than 40. ...


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Tourette Syndrome

Tourette syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by repeated involuntary movements and vocalizations called "tics." Although not medically dangerous, it causes serious social and psychological difficulties for those who have it because of its unusual, often disabling, symptoms. Typical onset for Tourette's is between the ages of 3 and 9, with males 3 to 4 times more likely to be affected than females. ...


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Vertigo

Vertigo is the sensation of spinning or dizziness, often accompanied by nausea and vomiting, that occurs as a result of problems within the brain or the inner ear. People with vertigo feel as if their surroundings are moving although no movement is actually occurring. Vertigo is one of the most common health problems in the United States; it affects many adults during their lifetimes. ...


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Dysphagia

Dysphagia, also known as a swallowing disorder, is not an uncommon condition. Because the swallowing process is vital to gastrointestinal health, and the throat functions as a pathway for respiration as well as ingestion, swallowing disorders are not only uncomfortable, but may be life-threatening. There are two types of dysphagia: esophageal and oropharyngeal. Esophageal dysphagia refers to the sensation of food getting stuck in the base of the throat or chest after swallowing. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is caused by weakened throat muscles that make it difficult to move food from the mouth into the throat and esophagus when swallowing. Older individuals are more commonly affected by oropharyngeal dysphagia because of weaker teeth and throat muscles. In addition, people with neurological problems or nervous system disorders may also experience oropharyngeal dysphagia. Individuals who suffer from acid reflux or esophageal problems are more likely to suffer from esophageal dysphagia. ...


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Copyright © 2019 by Dr. David Edelman MD and Dr. Leonardo. All Rights Reserved.